U.S. Supreme Court Denies Democrat Demands for Universal Mail-in-Voting in Texas

A Democrat bid to force universal vote-by-mail in the state of Texas was rejected by the US Supreme Court on Monday.

U.S. Supreme Court Denies Democrat Demands for Universal Mail-in-Voting in Texas

A Democrat bid to force universal vote-by-mail in the state of Texas was rejected by the US Supreme Court on Monday.

The decision will keep intact the current state law which only permits voters who are 65 or older to cast no-excuse absentee ballots.

The Texas Democratic Party had argued that the current law violates the Constitution’s 26th Amendment, which states that the right to vote “shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of age.

In September, the divided federal appeals court rejected the claim, stating that the current Texas law does not increase the difficulty of voting, however the panel allowed for a possible challenge based on the Constitution’s equal protection clause.

Voting by mail has long been a partisan issue, yet has drawn increased scrutiny following the 2020 presidential election. The Republican Party has focused on security vulnerabilities of mail-in voting, alleging that the rapid introduction of the new voting systems led to widespread fraud in the November election.

The case filings can be found here: Texas Democratic Party v. Abbott, 19-1389

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