YouTube Announces Election Fraud Claims Will Be Removed

YouTube said Wednesday that it will now remove content that alleges fraud or voting irregularities altered the outcome of the 2020 U.

YouTube Announces Election Fraud Claims Will Be Removed

YouTube said Wednesday that it will now remove content that alleges fraud or voting irregularities altered the outcome of the 2020 U.S. presidential election.

The company made the announcement in a blog entry on their website.

The Internet video website is suggesting that the videos will be violating its community guidelines which “prohibit spam, scams, or other manipulated media, coordinated influence operations, and any content that seeks to incite violence.

The company has justified the decision, claiming that the safe harbor deadline has passed and the states have now certified the results with Joe Biden has the presumptive president elect.

“Our policies prohibit misleading viewers about where and how to vote. We also disallow content alleging widespread fraud or errors changed the outcome of a historical U.S. Presidential election,” the company explained. “However in some cases, that has meant allowing controversial views on the outcome or process of counting votes of a current election as election officials have worked to finalize counts… Yesterday was the safe harbor deadline for the U.S. Presidential election and enough states have certified their election results to determine a President-elect… Given that, we will start removing any piece of content uploaded today (or anytime after) that misleads people by alleging that widespread fraud or errors changed the outcome of the 2020 U.S. Presidential election, in line with our approach towards historical U.S. Presidential elections.”

“For example, we will remove videos claiming that a Presidential candidate won the election due to widespread software glitches or counting errors.”

The move has already resonated with individuals who are calling to remove internet companies’ protection under Section 230 of the 1996 Communications Decency Act.

YouTube has taken the action just one day after the Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton filed a lawsuit with the U.S. Supreme Court which accuses officials in four states of making unconstitutional modifications to mail-in voting rules in their respective states.

We hope you enjoyed your experience! Find more honest reporting on our Facebook, Twitter, and Parler pages. You can also help others find news that matters by signing up to "The Enfield Weekly Recap" newsletter.