McConnell Instructed Fellow Senators To Accept the Electoral College Vote

On Tuesday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell warned his fellow senators to not object to the Electoral College votes cast on Monday.

McConnell Instructed Fellow Senators To Accept the Electoral College Vote

On Tuesday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell warned his fellow senators to not object to the Electoral College votes cast on Monday.

The Minneapolis Star-Tribune reported that McConnell privately warned Republican senators to not dispute the Electoral College tally when Congress convenes in a joint session to confirm the results on January 6.

McConnell believes a move to destabilize the presidential election would yield a “terrible vote” for Republicans in the Georgia senate runoff elections in January, according to two sources cited in the Minneapolis Star-Tribune.

The Majority leader had opened to the senate by stating “I want to congratulate President-elect Joe BidenMany of us had hoped the presidential election would yield a different result,” he said. “But our system of government has the processes to determine who will be sworn in on Jan. 20. The Electoral College has spoken.”

The statements rapidly drew criticism from conservatives supporting President Donald Trump’s efforts challenging the 2020 election results.

The president has pledged to continue challenging the results of November’s elections, alleging that coordinated voter fraud has rendered Joe Biden an illegitimate winner of the Electoral College. The Trump campaign and allies have filed legal challenges in Arizona, Pennsylvania, Nevada, Georgia, and Wisconsin.

Meanwhile, Biden told reporters that he personally thanked McConnell for his remarks in a phone call, saying that they had a “good conversation.”

Although McConnell is urging his constituents to accept the results of Monday’s Electoral College vote, Alabama Representative Mo Brooks has led an effort to object to Monday’s results. Brooks intends to formally object to the results by leveraging the Constitution and the Electoral Count Act of 1887.

We have a superior role under the Constitution than the Supreme Court does, than any federal court judge does, than any state court judge does,” Brooks said last week. “What we say, goes. That’s the final verdict.

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