Congresswoman: We Are Going to Give Trump His Day in Congress

Marjorie Taylor Greene uploaded a video of her leaving the White House where she met with President Donald Trump and several other congressmen to hash-out an effort to overturn the Electoral College vote.

Congresswoman: We Are Going to Give Trump His Day in Congress

Marjorie Taylor Greene uploaded a video of her leaving the White House where she met with President Donald Trump and several other congressmen to hash-out an effort to overturn the Electoral College vote.

Representative-elect for Georgia’s 14th congressional district Marjorie Taylor Greene uploaded the video to Twitter. In the caption she stated that the President “deserves his day in court, AND we are definitely going to give him his day in Congress.

In the video, Greene states that “we already have a lot of people engaged” which may mean that the group of lawmakers who are planning to join the objection effort is increasing in size.

Just finished with our meetings here at the White House this afternoon. We had a great planning session for our January 6 objection. We aren’t going to let this election be stolen by Joe Biden and the democrats. President Trump won by a landslide. Call your House reps, call your Senators from your states. We’ve got to make sure they’re on board, and we already have a lot of people engaged. Okay, stay tuned,” Greene said after just walking out of the White House.

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows corroborated her message with a tweet of his own stating that “Several members of Congress just finished a meeting in the Oval Office with President @realDonaldTrump, preparing to fight back against mounting evidence of voter fraud. Stay tuned,” Meadows wrote Monday evening.

It appears they are planning for House Republicans to object to the casting of the Electoral College when Congress meets to certify the results on January 6.

The objections will leverage the Constitution and the Electoral Count Act of 1887 and must be made in writing by at least one House member and senator. The joint session will then break for a maximum of two hours to debate the basis of the objections. Afterwards, both the House and Senate will vote separately whether to accept or reject the objection requiring a majority vote from both chambers.

We hope you enjoyed your experience! Find more honest reporting on our Facebook, Twitter, and Parler pages. You can also help others find news that matters by signing up to "The Enfield Weekly Recap" newsletter.